Dave Howard

Dave Howard

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Guitarist / Composer / Arranger / Educator

Music style types… Pat Metheny, Oz Noy, Steely Dan, Robben Ford, Larry Carlton, Weather Report
ALL MUSIC: SOUVENIRS

Dave Howard performs throughout the United States, Canada and Europe. He is a exciting musician influenced by many great jazz, blues and funk artists. David Howard is a Professor at Berklee College of Music in Boston.

He’s a guitarist, composer, arranger and leader on many recordings including “Souvenirs” featuring Kenwood Dennard. “Clouds”, “Almost Carefree”,and “Block Island Summer” with the Joe Parillo Ensemble, and “Autumn Leaves” with Dave Rasmussen Jazz Orchestra.

Dave has Performed tours and clinics in Europe, and has worked as a Composer and Performer on various jingles.

Some European Concerts and Clinics includes: Roccella Jazz Festival / Clinics with the Dave Howard Calabrese 5tet Project, Cortale’ Jazz festival, Calabria, Italy. Umbria Jazz Clinics with Berklee College of Music, Umbria, Italy and The Pepperoncino Jazz Festival , Calabria, Italy.

Dave leads his group THE DAVE HOWARD INITIATIVE in high energy live performances and recordings of contemporary jazz/funk original compositions.

Dave’s new CD release is “INFINITE BLU” featuring a great group of musicians, six vocalists and all new compositions.

Fred Farell/WCS

Fred Farell/WCS

Reviewed by Kev Rowland

“Listening to Farell is like stepping back in Time, to mid-20th Century America, when Jazz and Romance were popular. His Sounscapes are like Odes to Love…Farell’s “Distant Song” provides enough soothing sounds for listeners to ponder the Human condition…He is joined by Dave Liebman on soprano & tenor Saxophones, and by Richie Beirach on acoustic Piano.” 
          “I give Fred, and his fellow master (musicians) an energy quotient rating of 4.99 for this CD.…One of the strongest Jazz Vocal performances I’ve listened to              yet in 2018.”
“…FARELL is the real deal in terms of Sincerity, his voice speaks authority as does the tender Truth expressed in his Lyrics…and musical arrangements…A performance that regularly stops you…in your tracks…”
“The mood of the Program is dark blue, solemn, and well matched to Fred’s Baritone, and the accompanying Instrumentation…with Farell writing all the Lyrics.”

“Fred Farell’s new CD is rewarding on several levels…”

“Fred Farell’s new CD is rewarding on several levels. His lyrics for the songs of Dave Liebman and Richie Beirach show that the instrumental pieces are surprisingly singable, adding to the jazz vocal repertoire. His singing is warm, quietly expressive, and really gets into the messages of the songs. And the playing of Liebman and Beirach is as creative as ever. Their fans will find much to enjoy on this rewarding set.”

Scott Yanow, Jazz journalist/Historian and Author of “The Jazz Singers”

Vocalist Fred Farell’s latest project Distant Song captures the music of Liebman and Beirach beautifully. Farell didn’t merely copy Liebman’s and Beirach’s compositions, he added sublime lyrics and a magically ethereal vocal style.

Devon Wendell, L.A. Jazz Scene

 

FRED FARELL began singing professionally during his military service in the USA, and Europe in 1967. His musical training includes: jazz vocal improvisation with pianist-composer and educator Richard Beirach; Private voice studies with Cynthia Hoffman, Richard Dorr, and Larry Chelsi; and music courses taken at The City College of New York; at which time he enrolled in Jazz studies taught by Jazz songstress and educator Sheila Jordan. His first appearances as a solo artist and group leader in New York, were at Loft galleries, and Jazz clubs during the 1970’s and early 1980’s; including return engagements at Sweet Basil, and Greene Street; during which time he was
an artist-member of Cobi Narita’s Universal Jazz Coalition. As a featured soloist, as well as an ensemble singer, Mr. Farell has performed at Avery Fisher Hall, The Brooklyn Academy of Music, The Kitchen, WBAI Radio, The Museum of Modern Art, and Symphony Space, with such jazz masters and artists as the late saxophonist Dexter Gordon; Pianists: Barry Harris, the late Albert Dailey, and Kenny Barron; Bassists: the late Herman Wright, Rufus Reid and Ratso Harris; Female Vocal Artist-educator Jay Clayton (The Voice Group); and Natural Sound Composer-pianist Kirk Nurock. In the creative expression of Jazz used to present the Gospel message, the singer has been a featured soloist with the Don Hanson Ensemble, led by the saxophonist-composer; has appeared on the Queens Public Cable TV Network; and is currently co-leader of the Gospel Jazz group “JazzLite”. In this group setting, Mr. Farell ministers with his gospel lyrics for original compositions, and Jazz standards, and features Pianists Jeff Kruh, and Joel Weiskopf in varying instrumental formats, depending upon the venues entered.

Richard Beirach, Dave Liebman, Frederick Farell, Red Rock Recording Studios, June 11, 2015. David W. Coulter Photography

Image from HighResAudio.

 

 

Miles Donahue/WCS

Miles Donahue/WCS

Just Passing Through

O’s Notes: Saxophonist, composer and producer Miles Donahue presents a fine contemporary jazz set with Just Passing Through. Bassist Joe Santerre gets in the mix on “Living Room Blues” before Donahue soothes us on song “Killing Me Softly”, the lone cover. Guest Mike Stern (g) adds fusion elements to “7-9-65” and the funky “Railroaded”. We also enjoyed the cool vibe of “Donny’s Groove” and “A Man of Few Words”.
D. Oscar  Groomes 
Just Passing Thru is the latest music album by Miles Donahue. The songs feature Miles Donahue on saxophones, trumpet, and keyboards; Joe Santerre on electric bass; Larry Finn on drums; Ricardo Monzon on percussion; Alain Mallet on keyboards; with Mike Stern on guitar. The result is a versatile fusion that crosses boundaries of style and substance, from jazz to rhythm & blues to elements of rock and soul, and more. A captivating original treasury, Just Passing Thru is highly recommended. The tracks are “hear My Words”, “Living Room Blues”, “Killing Me Softly”, “Just Passing Thru”, “Donny’s Groove”, “A Man of Few Words”, “7/9/65”, “Railroaded”, and “Ireland”.

 

 

 

 

Review by Leonid Auskern from Jazz Square

 

A Welcome Guest

On Just Passing Thru

Miles Donahue makes himself comfortable

Miles Donahue’s latest album, coming on the heels of The Bug (Whaling City Sound, 2017), Just Passing Thru is large in scope and beautiful in execution. The absurdly talented player, vibrant on both tenor and soprano saxes, trumpet, and keyboard, shows just how broad his musical wingspan is. It certainly helps that he has an amazing crew behind him. Joe Santerre provides power grooves on electric bass as does Larry Finn on drums. They are joined by percussionist Ricardo Monzon, keyboard player Alain Mallet, and a handful of tracks featuring guitarist Mike Stern. With a vision that includes Crusaders’ style R&B, Weather Report fusion, and lovely, soulful turns, Donahue is masterly and versatile.

From song to song, there are wide swings of style and substance, from moments of tenderness, passages of grandeur, and fistfuls of exhilarating, technical wonder. The opening “Hear My Words” kicks off with an ingenious, shuffling melody that settles into a samba, and then finishes with a little funk. “Living Room Blues” swings with verve and passion, showcasing Santerre’s powerful bass. “A Man of a Few Words” opens with an introspective statement that morphs into alto soulfulness, buoyed by Mallet’s beautiful electric piano. “Railroaded” has a funk foundation to go along with its zesty ensemble playing. Joining that performance is none other than Mike Stern, one of the great voices in jazz guitar, and his solo here is proof of that. And then there’s the surprising “Ireland,” a nod to Donahue’s ancestral homeland that is both respectful and anthemic, in the way a rock song is anthemic. Talk about unexpected!

Throughout Donahue’s lovely Whaling City Sound recording, he never fails to challenge convention. In many, often subtle ways, he ventures out on the unexpected limb rather than the sturdy one that’s already been tried. His adventurousness is gratifying. Donahue finds a myriad of ways to reward his listeners and we are grateful for that. It may or may not be a fact that jazz musicians age with grace and class. In Miles Donahue’s case, the concept bears out. It is a joy to follow his risky explorations, as he makes his way through a labyrinth of unexpected turns. More than simply Just Passing Thru, Donahue is staying a while, long enough to leave a permanent impression on today’s jazz landscape.

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