Frank D’Rone

Frank D’Rone/WCS

Web site: www.frankdarone.com

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Press Release

Publicity: Chicago Tribune (Chicagoan of the Year 2012), Examiner.com, Chicago Tribune, O’s Place Jazz Magazine, The Borderland (UK), Jersey Jazz (June issue), SloaneView, nestor, jazzwax.com, Jazz Society of Oregon, Midwest Record

Radio: Raposa Media’s Adult Standards Weekly Tracking Report 033012

WBLZ-Blazeradio, WJUB/The Breeze,Vocal Standards,WRHU 88.7 FM, WMVY-FM, Jazz Spaces/94.1 FM Radio, FM 97.3 WZBG,JAZZRADIODC.COM, Randy McElligott CHUO 89.1 FM,CKCU-93.1 FM,Big Band Jump/The Don Kennedy Show, KKCR,KCMN Radio, Taintradio.org-Raleigh, WMVY-FM,WBGO Jazz 88.3 FM, WEMU 89.1FM, WRRG,WCNY, Breathing Room/Fred Wasser, WaxTrenzz, The Vocal Touch

Promo Photo:
CDs: Whaling City Sound
Mixed Media Client since: 1999
Listen: Song Clip

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Frank D’Rone named the Chicagoan of the Year for Jazz in the Chicago Tribune

 

It’s a great honor for Frank to be named the Chicagoan of the Year for Jazz in the Chicago Tribune plus “Double Exposure” (Whaling City Sound) gets a nice mention here. Thank you Howard Reich!
Here’s the link: http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/art/chi-20121227-chicagoans-year-entertainment-pictures,0,6638799.photogallery?index=chi-20121227-chicagoans-year-entertainment-pic-004
Download second page of the paper Chicagoan of the Year in Jazz0001 which includes an excellent picture that isn’t on the link.

Happy New Year!

In Tune International December 2012 “Double Exposure” Review

Dan Singer from New York City turns the spotlight on some overlooked Singers of the past and some bright newcomers, all of which are Singer’s Sing

Double Exposure by Frank D’Rone

Here is Frank D’Rone on “Double Exposure” returning to discs again with a large band sounding like his famous fine Mercury records from 1959. It’s amazing how sometimes time stands still. “When The Sun Comes Out” (Arlen/Kohler) contains some very long held exciting super charged bright notes. Listen to a most brilliant bristling sounding scat ending with the large band here. “Make Someone Happy” (Styne/Comden/Green) affords him the opportunity to showcase his fine guitar playing. His vocal contains some astonishing deeply sensitive lyrical vocalizing. It ‘s a preview for the title of the following selection. “Pure Imagination” (Newley/Bricusse). What a consummate fusion of song and singer. The huge orchestra underplays while skillfully assisting Frank’s gentle singing. Even his humming here  is simply gorgeous. His last note was just incredible. The nifty “Pick Yourself Up” (Kern/Fields) at first kicks things up in the first half with a perky, wordless arrangement. And then receives a joyous, full of energy, band support. Mr. D’Rone knowingly presents the familiar words for a smashing conclusion. Just hold on to your hats. Frank’s guitar solo on “The Very Thought Of You” (Noble) is most tender. His artistry shines throughout in a slow, romantic, irresistible take. The difficult “Dancing On The Ceiling” (Rodgers/Hart) has him again playing his guitar midway. He makes it sound so easy and effortless. Bravo to producer Phil Kelly. He knew just what perfect buttons to push on all 11 songs.

 

Congrats to Frank D’Rone-what a week! Started with his interview on http://wdcb.org/, in advance of his appearance at the Chicago Jazz Festival, and praise from Howard Reich, pre-eminent Chicago Tribune critic:
…The great Chicago singer
this year turned 80 and released arguably the best recording of his career, “Double Exposure.” You’d think that would merit a slot on the main stage, but the programmers of the Chicago Jazz Festival deemed otherwise. Even so, D’Rone never should be underestimated, as he showed during a recent, brilliant run at the Jazz Showcase. 2:20 p.m. at the Jazz on Jackson Stage
…This is a big year for Chicago singer D’Rone, who turned 80, turned in an indelible engagement at the Jazz Showcase and turned out possibly the best recording of his career, “Double Exposure.” Too bad he’s not being featured at night on the festival’s main stage, where he belongs. 2:20 p.m. at the Jazz on Jackson Stage…
The revered Chicago singer Frank D’Rone celebrated his 80th birthday with glowing vocal tone and relentlessly inventive singing…D’Rone sang poetically in “When Joanna Loved Me” and aggressively in “Just One of Those Things” …
The audience was quite large and enthusiastic and gave Frank a standing ovation at the end.
From the Chicago Sun-Times 9/3: “Crooner Frank D’Rone mellowed the vibe after Stein, serenading two ladies in particular in the press pit. One of them was his wife, who he confessed acts as a lyric prompter should he forget any words. ‘Make Someone Happy’ from D’Rone’s new disc, Double Exposure, seemed to speak of their relationship. The 80-year-old singer scatted breezily along with his lovely guitar playing, particularly evident on the chestnut “All The Things You Are.” At the end of Frank’s performance, he was surprised with an award from the City of Chicago, a commendation from the Mayor, Rahm Emanuel. Thanks to all involved especially Joyce McGinnis and Jazz Festival board member, Neil Tesser. Very nice!!!
Photo: Congrats to Frank D'Rone-what a week! Started with his interview on http://wdcb.org/,  in advance of his appearance at the Chicago Jazz Festival, and praise from Howard Reich, pre-eminent Chicago Tribune critic:
...The great Chicago singer this year turned 80 and released arguably the best recording of his career, "Double Exposure." You'd think that would merit a slot on the main stage, but the programmers of the Chicago Jazz Festival deemed otherwise. Even so, D'Rone never should be underestimated, as he showed during a recent, brilliant run at the Jazz Showcase. 2:20 p.m. at the Jazz on Jackson Stage
...This is a big year for Chicago singer D'Rone, who turned 80, turned in an indelible engagement at the Jazz Showcase and turned out possibly the best recording of his career, "Double Exposure." Too bad he's not being featured at night on the festival's main stage, where he belongs. 2:20 p.m. at the Jazz on Jackson Stage...
The revered Chicago singer Frank D'Rone celebrated his 80th birthday with glowing vocal tone and relentlessly inventive singing...D'Rone sang poetically in "When Joanna Loved Me" and aggressively in "Just One of Those Things" ...
The audience was quite large and enthusiastic and gave Frank a standing ovation at the end.
From the Chicago Sun-Times 9/3: "Crooner Frank D’Rone mellowed the vibe after Stein, serenading two ladies in particular in the press pit. One of them was his wife, who he confessed acts as a lyric prompter should he forget any words. 'Make Someone Happy' from D’Rone’s new disc, Double Exposure, seemed to speak of their relationship. The 80-year-old singer scatted breezily along with his lovely guitar playing, particularly evident on the chestnut “All The Things You Are.” At the end of Frank's performance, he was surprised with an award from the City of Chicago, a commendation from the Mayor, Rahm Emanuel.  Thanks to all involved especially Joyce McGinnis and Jazz Festival board member, Neil Tesser. Very nice!!!

City of Chicago proclamation0001

Frank D’Rone: “Double Exposure” (Whaling City Sound). Great male jazz vocalists remain in desperately short supply, but a few are still battling to keep standards high. Chicagoan D’Rone ranks among them, his “Double Exposure” giving listeners the rare opportunity to hear him on record with a big band. Like his longtime peers Frank Sinatra and Tony Bennett, 80-year-old D’Rone conveys an authority born of decades in front of ensembles large and small. No vocalist shapes a melodic line quite like D’Rone, who brings surging rhythmic power to “When the Sun Comes Out,” a whimsical spirit to “Pick Yourself Up” and imperturbable swing rhythm to “The One I Love.” And then there’s D’Rone’s guitar playing, a beguiling touch on several cuts. Considering the durability of D’Rone’s career, the integrity of his art and the ambition of this recording, “Double Exposure” arrives as an important document, showing what a great American singer can achieve at an exalted age.

Frank D’Rone    –   Double Exposure   3/3
O’s Notes: Frank is a cabaret-style balladeer equally at home in front of a large ensemble or solo, singing and playing guitar. In both cases D’Rone is in command and projecting strong vocals. The program alternates between the big band and vocal/guitar tracks all centered around Frank. Phil Kelly produced and arranged music. He also conducts the band. Our favorite is “Pick Yourself Up.”    D. Oscar Groomes/O’s Place Jazz Magazine

“…the new CD — “Double Exposure” — was recently recorded in a studio session and attests to his incredibly well-preserved voice. He sounds no different now than he did when he recorded for Mercury in the late 1950’s. The album is amazing, and beautifully arranged and conducted by our own Phil Kelly. Half of the tracks are with an orchestra, and the other half are just Frank singing and accompanying himself on guitar.
http://www.amazon.com/Double-Exposure-Frank-DRone/dp/B005LY46CI
I can’t imagine anyone not loving… D’Rone…unique, instantly recognizable voices.” ~ Frederick Stack

“The kind of performance that the Vegas gods are smiling down upon, D’Rone could teach contemporary singers a thing or tow about finding the meat of the lyric in the classic song bag and how to sell that song in even the simplistic settings. If you’re hip enough to dig real jazz vocal, this old dog still knows how to bury a bone! Check it out.” ~ Midwest Record

“We who remember D’Rone from years back are reminded that if had never sung a note, he’s a superb jazz guitarist. But, lucky for us, he sang then, and he’s still singing now. And how!” ~ George Fendel ~ Jazz Society of Oregon

Dick LaPalm’s Radio:

TRACKING REPORT “DOUBLE EXPOSURE” FRANK D’RONE

EAST

WAER – Syracuse
WBAI – New York City
WCDB – Albany, NY
WCNY – Syracuse
WDIY – Bethlehem, PA
WEOS – Geneva, NY
WERU – Bangor, ME
WESM – Salisbury, MD
WFCR – Amherst, MA
WFDU – Teaneck, NJ
WHFC – Baltimore
WHRB – Boston
WICB – Ithaca, NY
WICN – Boston
WKCR – New York City
WLFP – Pittsburgh
WMNR – Monroe, CT
WMUA – Amherst, MA
WPFW – Washington DC
WPKN – Bridgeport
WPLM – Boston
WQLN – Erie, PA
WRHU – Long Island, NY
WRTC – Hartford
WRTI – Philadelphia
WSCA – Portsmouth, NH
WVIA – Scranton, PA
WVPR – State of VT
WWUH – Hartford
WYPR – Baltimore

MIDWEST

KBEM – Minneapolis
KFAI – Minneapolis
KIOS – Omaha
KKFI – Kansas City
KMSU – Mankato, MN
KRAQ – Jackson, IA
KWIT – Sioux City, IA
KWMU – St. Louis
KWWC – Columbia, Mo
WBAA – Lafayette, IN
WBLV – Grand Rapids, MI
WCBE – Columbus, OH
WCPN – Cleveland
WDCB – Chicago
WEMU – Detroit
WGCS – So. Bend, IN
WGLT – Normal, IL
WGTE – Toledo
WGVU – Grand Rapids, MI
WHPK – Chicago
WICR – Indianapolis
WKAR – Lansing/Detroit
WORT – Madison, WI
WRCJ – Detroit
WRUW – Cleveland
WSIU – Carbondale, IL
WWSP – Stevens Pt, WI
WYSO – Dayton
WYSU – Toungstown, OH

SYNDICATORS

Jazz Aftr Hours (Jim Wilke)
82 Stations

WFMT Jazz Network (Bob Parlocha)
170 Stations

CABLE and INTERNET

Pure Jazz Radio
Radioio Jazz
Accujazz
The Jazz Groove

MOST PLAYED TRACKS (In no special order)

“Pick Yourself Up”
“Speak Low”
“Make Someone Happy”
“When The Sun Comes Out”
“Lover Come Back To Me”

Double the Pleasure

Legendary Chicago talent Frank D’Rone still gets it done on Double Exposure

If you haven’t heard the velvety voice and sultry strumming of Chicago treasure Frank D’Rone, well, better late than never. Fortunately, you can hear everything the man has to offer, and maybe a little bit more, on his latest album, Double Exposure.

D’Rone, who has been around long enough to be endorsed by none other than Nat King Cole, has a natural born affinity for providing great entertainment. Whether he’s belting out in front of a sizzling big band, singing some swinging pop-jazz, or crooning some acoustic ballads, D’Rone can do it all and make it seem effortless. Double Exposure, and his frequent gigs in and around Chicago, and throughout his career in major nightclubs throughout the country, attests to this.

So, yes, D’Rone has indeed been there and done that. He has connected with audiences for decades; his mellow demeanor and outsize talent is shown in abundance on Double Exposure. The recording pops on impeccably arranged big-band style tunes like the opening “When the Sun Comes Out” and “Pick Yourself Up.” D’Rone makes solid contact on his many guitar-based ballads, including “Make Someone Happy” and “The Very Thought of You.” Throughout the record, D’Rone proves he can dazzle regardless of the genre.

Born in Providence, Frank started singing and playing the guitar on stage at the age of five. At 11, he had his own local radio show and at 13 he’d won an artist’s degree in classical guitar. He formed his own band and played local dates while finishing school then took his show on the road, playing in New York City and Chicago. Frank eventually ending up in a successful residency at a Chicago club called Dante’s Inferno.

During this time, Chicago proved to be a friendly place and D’Rone made a name for himself among the elite artists of the era. Celebrities such as Frank Sinatra, Johnny Mathis, Ella Fitzgerald, Shecky Greene, Oscar Peterson, Alan King, Ray Brown, Stan Kenton, June Christy and many more turned up to see D’Rone do his thing. He gained a reputation as a true artist, a singer’s singer. One of his most enthusiastic admirers, the late Nat “King” Cole, penned the liner notes for Frank’s first album. Sinatra requested that D’Rone be hired to play the lounge when he played Las Vegas and Atlantic City venues.

D’Rone’s rare talent has served him well everywhere he goes. Frank was headlining the world famous “Copacabana” when Tony Bennett took over the microphone on opening night and told the audience, “A few years back, Nat “King” Cole said that Frank D’Rone was the finest singer around. Tonight he has proved that Nat was right!”

If it’s “right” with Cole and Bennett, it’ll be “right” with you, too. Check out Double Exposure.

###

From radio promoter Dick LaPalm: “Check out the Marc Myers current, and highly regarded Jazz blog.  He writes about “Double Exposure,” features his 3-part interview with Frank from March of 2010, and plays “When The Sun Comes Out” from the cd.  Go to www.jazzwax.com and scroll down beyond Trammps, Bix, McKusick, etc.  You can’t miss it.  Nor should you.  Really a good one, guys!  Onward!”

Frank D’Rone’s great voice and commanding stage presence make it easy to understand why he became a recurring guest on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson and was requested by Frank Sinatra to appear in the lounge whenever “The Chairman” was performing in the show rooms of the Las Vegas and Atlantic City venues. Frank’s TV appearances include the Dean Martin Show, Steve Allen Show, Merv Griffin Show, Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Mike Douglas Show, Garry Moore Show, and Joey Bishop Show. Awards include Playboy All Star Jazz Poll. UNICO Performer of the Year, Chicago Jazz Magazine Award, and Leonardo Da Vinci Award for Excellence. Featured Artists
Frank D’Rone: vocals, guitar
Brad Allison, Paul Baron, Jay Thomas, Steve Mostevoy: trumpets
Gary Shutes, Dan Marcus, Dave Marriott, Nelson Bell: trombones
Travis Ranney, Mark Taylor, Alexey Nikolaev, Jim Coile: saxes
Track Listings
When The Sun Comes Out • Make Someone Happy • Pure Imagination • Just Imagine • Pick Yourself Up • The Very Thought Of You • The One I Love • Dancing On The Ceiling • Speak Low • Oh You Crazy Moon • Lover Come Back To Me

Frank D'Rone with Guitar.

Frank D’Rone’s great voice, musicianship and commanding stage presence, along with his ability to master the interpretation of a song lyric, lend themselves to any entertainment atmosphere and make it easy to understand why he became a recurring guest on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson and was requested by Frank Sinatra to appear in the lounge whenever “The Chairman” was performing in the show rooms of the Las Vegas and Atlantic City venues.

“A singer with an individual sound that invites no comparisons; a singer who can seemingly sustain a note forever; one of the few singers who can change a mood of a room from song to song by moving from one emotion to another naturally. He holds an audience.”

–Nat “King” Cole

“It is simply impossible to find fault with anything Frank D’Rone sings or plays.”

–Leonard Feather – Downbeat

“All singing from the heart and no put-ons”

–Will Friedwald – “Jazz Singing”

“A seasoned singer for all seasons. Few equal D’Rone’s mix of voice, guitar. The superb jazz improviser somehow manages to combine the best of two worlds: a warm baritone that adeptly expresses melodic nuances and a fluid guitar technique that operates exclusively at the virtuoso level.”

–Howard Reich – The Chicago Tribune

“All his songs are rendered with a keen jazz sensibility understandable enough for someone who’s worked with Woody Herman and Carl Fontana.”

–Boston Globe

“Whether in a studio or in a live ‘in person’ setting, Frank excels. He can musically do no wrong.”

–In Tune International

“D’Rone is a cabaret singer of the highest order”

–Sherman Kaplan – WBBM AM Radio, Chicago

“D’Rone has been a ‘singer’s singer’ who has drawn praise and support from such royalty as Frank Sinatra and Tony Bennett.”

–Chicago Sun Times

“What a joy to find that not only has D’Rone’s voice lost none of its richness and accuracy of pitch, but that he still swings like the complete musician he is.”

–Journal into Melody

“Real talent will always be respected and that is something Frank D’Rone possesses in large quantities.”

–Las Vegas Review-Journal

“…when you listen to D’Rone you are listening to the real thing.”

–Tony Bennett